Parks to Illustrate CW150 Themes: A Preliminary List

Great class session today, folks!

As promised, you’ll find below a compilation of the three parks that you have preliminarily selected to illustrate each of the 16 themes established by the NPS in Holding the High Ground and the Civil War Handbook. Again, our goal is to use these themes to connect to 48 different units of the national park system.

As discussed in class, I need your final list of thee suggested parks for each theme posted to the appropriate theme page (found in the blog’s right-hand column) no later than 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, February 2, 2011. In addition, there is still some resolution necessary to ensure that we’re representing parks only once:

  1. Richmond National Battlefield Park: this park was recommended by you for both Women Amidst War and Industry/Economics. To me (and based on our in-class discussion, I think) it seems to make more sense in Industry/Economics, but Doug, Makenzie, & Mary, please discuss and let me know your decision and justification. Thanks!
  2. Vicksburg National Military Park: this park was recommended by you for both Women Amidst War and The Civilian Experience. My recommendation is that we use this to help illustrate the latter from a Southern (and civilians-under-siege) perspective. Makenzie & Mary, please discuss and let me know your decision and justification. Thanks!
  3. Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield: this park was recommended by you for both Race and Ordeal of the Border States. My recommendation would be the latter, but I’m open if folks feel otherwise. Laurie, Andrew, Amy, & Dianna, please discuss and let me know your decision and justification. Thanks!
  4. Boston African American National Historic Site: this park was recommended by you for both Race and Emancipation. My recommendation would be the latter, but I’m open if folks feel otherwise. Laurie, Andrew, & Dianna, please discuss and let me know your decision and justification. Thanks!
  5. Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site: this park was recommended by you for both Reconstruction and Causes. My recommendation would be the former, but I’m open if folks feel otherwise. Melissa L. & Doug, please discuss and let me know your decision and justification. Thanks!

Please take a close look at the parks below. Of course, it is difficult to limit ourselves to just 48 parks, but are there any parks glaringly missing? Would you add or subtract to our list? If so, how?

Preliminary List of Parks (Source: worksheets posted in-class)

**Please note that the redundancies requiring your resolution have been marked with a double asterisk. Also, I’ve added the four-letter park acronym after each park name, as well as a hotlink to the park’s official home page.

Women Amidst War

The Military Experience

Industry & Economics

Legacy of the Civil War

Causes

The Civilian Experience

Race

Ordeal of the Border States

The War & the Westward Movement

The U.S. on the Eve of the Civil War

Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom

Consequences

Death and Dying

Reconstruction

Reconciliation, Commemoration, & Preservation

The Changing War

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About Greg Shine

Adjunct faculty in the History Department at Portland State University, where I teach historic site interpretation. Former Chief Ranger & Historian at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.
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2 Responses to Parks to Illustrate CW150 Themes: A Preliminary List

  1. Andrew Carlson says:

    Greg,

    I’d like to add Martin van Buren National Historic Site to my list for “The U.S. on the Eve of the Civil War.”

    As the homepage on nps.gov says of this park, “Politics before the Civil War was a whirlwind of opposing interest groups. Martin Van Buren was able to unite those groups becoming president in 1837, but he was unable to gain a second term.” I believe that this would be the perfect podcast to release first about my theme, then get into the more “snapshot” aspect of which I was discussing for the other two themes, taking it more literally.

    From the late 1830’s to the 1850s, the time which van Buren was the most prominent, there was a lot happening with regards to political turmoil and unrest in America. While not necessarily the cause of the Civil War, these certain events would be a great thing to discuss as the “happenings prior to the war.”

    Thoughts? Make sense? It does to me!

    Andrew

  2. Shawn Daley says:

    Greg-

    Can I add Governor’s Island (NY) my list for “The Changing War” — people suggested those today as NPS sites that would work with the 1863 Draft Riots.

    I will whittle mine down to 3 by Wednesday.

    Since Brandon has Reconstruction, should he be talking with both Doug and Melissa?
    (Just representing my group).

    Some musings:

    It’s not mine to ask for, but Richmond NPS seems like it could fit a big number of other categories — there was a Naval Battle (gunboats) there (Drewery’s Bluff), which could fit MaKenzie’s topic, a major field hospital (Chimborazo) that could work for Death and Dying or The Civilian Experience. I’m not trying to pry it from Doug, but in looking at those other areas maybe a plantation could stand in for the Economics one, since his other two are border and Northern, maybe a look to the deep south would be stronger? Richmond NPS seems a bit like the Fredericksburg and Spotslyvania park — so (too) much contained in one park that you almost want to have it cover multiple angles.

    For Andy’s “eve of battle” — would Manassas be a cleaner fit, considering the stories of how people went out for picnics to watch the battle thinking it would be a grand affair? Again, not that I want to move that from MaKenzie, because it fits her sequence well. Although, for Naval Battles, apparently Cape Hatteras (either the Monitor of the Merrimack sunk there) and Arkansas Post both have those, if she wanted to explore the naval options.

    enjoy the weekend all!

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